Metabolic Disorders

Inherited metabolic disorders are genetic conditions that result in metabolism problems. Most people with inherited metabolic disorders have a defective gene that results in an enzyme deficiency. There are hundreds of different genetic metabolic disorders, and their symptoms, treatments, and prognoses vary widely.

Analbuminemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifested by the presence of a very low amount of circulating serum albumin. Affected individuals have few clinical symptoms other than mild edema, hypotension, fatigue, and, occasionally, a peculiar lower body lipodystrophy (mainly in adult females). The most common biochemical finding is a gross hyperlipidemia, with a significant increase in the total and LDL cholesterol concentrations, but normal concentrations of HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Analbuminemia often leads to fetal or neonatal death in sibs in families of analbuminemic subjects, which may explain the rarity of the trait

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Arginase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a defect in the final step in the urea cycle, the hydrolysis of arginine to urea and ornithine.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Alpha-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Deficiency is characterized by hypotonia, metabolic acidosis, and hyperlactatemia immediately after birth. The life expectancy is limited to about 30 months of age. Death is caused by neurologic deterioration.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) results from a deficiency in one or another of the enzymes of cortisol biosynthesis. In about 95% of cases, 21-hydroxylation is impaired in the zona fasciculata of the adrenal cortex so that 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) is not converted to 11-deoxycortisol. Because of defective cortisol synthesis, ACTH levels increase, resulting in overproduction and accumulation of cortisol precursors, particularly 17-OHP, proximal to the block. This causes excessive production of androgens, resulting in virilization.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:

Multiple carboxylase deficiency (MCD) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized primarily by cutaneous and neurologic abnormalities. Symptoms result from the patient's inability to reutilize biotin, a necessary nutrient. Sweetman recognized that multiple carboxylase deficiency could be classified into early and late forms. The early form showed higher urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid than the late form and was associated with normal plasma biotin concentrations. Sweetman proposed a defect in holocarboxylase synthetase and intestinal biotin absorption, respectively.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Multiple carboxylase deficiency (MCD) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized primarily by cutaneous and neurologic abnormalities. Symptoms result from the patient's inability to reutilize biotin, a necessary nutrient. Sweetman recognized that multiple carboxylase deficiency could be classified into early and late forms. The early form showed higher urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid than the late form and was associated with normal plasma biotin concentrations. Sweetman proposed a defect in holocarboxylase synthetase and intestinal biotin absorption, respectively.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
3 days
Sample:
DBS
Alternative:

Beta thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is the iron-containing protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to cells throughout the body. In people with beta thalassemia, low levels of hemoglobin lead to a lack of oxygen in many parts of the body. Affected individuals also have a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), which can cause pale skin, weakness, fatigue, and more serious complications. People with beta thalassemia are at an increased risk of developing abnormal blood clots. Beta thalassemia is classified into two types depending on the severity of symptoms: thalassemia major (also known as Cooley's anemia) and thalassemia intermedia. Of the two types, thalassemia major is more severe.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Multiple carboxylase deficiency (MCD) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized primarily by cutaneous and neurologic abnormalities. Symptoms result from the patient's inability to reutilize biotin, a necessary nutrient. Sweetman recognized that multiple carboxylase deficiency could be classified into early and late forms. The early form showed higher urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid than the late form and was associated with normal plasma biotin concentrations. Sweetman proposed a defect in holocarboxylase synthetase and intestinal biotin absorption, respectively.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
3 days
Sample:
DBS
Alternative:

Barth syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked disease conventionally characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy (CMD) with endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE), a predominantly proximal skeletal myopathy, growth retardation, neutropenia, and organic aciduria, particularly excess of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Features of the disease that are less well known include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, isolated left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC), ventricular arrhythmia, motor delay, poor appetite, fatigue and exercise intolerance, hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, and dramatic late catch-up growth after growth delay throughout childhood.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a rare inherited lipid-storage disease characterized clinically by progressive neurologic dysfunction (cerebellar ataxia beginning after puberty, systemic spinal cord involvement and a pseudobulbar phase leading to death), premature atherosclerosis, and cataracts. Large deposits of cholesterol and cholestanol are found in virtually every tissue, particularly the Achilles tendons, brain, and lungs. Cholestanol, the 5-alpha-dihydro derivative of cholesterol, is enriched relative to cholesterol in all tissues. The diagnosis can be made by demonstrating cholestanol in abnormal amounts in the serum and tendon of persons suspected of being affected. Plasma cholesterol concentrations are low normal in CTX patients.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by poor growth, intrahepatic cholestasis, and increased serum citrulline. Most patients show spontaneous improvement by 1 year of age. However, some patients may have a progressive course with continued failure to thrive and dyslipidemia caused by citrin deficiency (FTTDCD), and some may develop chronic or fatal liver disease.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Osteopetrosis is a bone disease that makes bones abnormally dense and prone to breakage (fracture). Researchers have described several major types of osteopetrosis, which are usually distinguished by their pattern of inheritance: autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked. The different types of the disorder can also be distinguished by the severity of their signs and symptoms.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Dihyropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency shows large phenotypic variability, ranging from no symptoms to a convulsive disorder with motor and mental retardation in homozygous patients. In addition, homozygous and heterozygous mutation carriers can develop severe toxicity after the administration of the antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU), which is also catabolized by the DPYD enzyme.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency is a severe condition that can affect several body systems. Signs and symptoms of this condition usually appear shortly after birth, and they can vary widely among affected individuals. A common feature of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency is a potentially life-threatening buildup of lactic acid in tissues (lactic acidosis), which can cause nausea, vomiting, severe breathing problems, and an abnormal heartbeat. Neurological problems are also common in this condition; the first symptoms in affected infants are often decreased muscle tone (hypotonia) and extreme tiredness (lethargy). As the problems worsen, affected infants can have difficulty feeding, decreased alertness, and seizures. Liver problems can also occur in dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency, ranging from an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly) to life-threatening liver failure. In some affected people, liver disease, which can begin anytime from infancy to adulthood, is the primary symptom. The liver problems are usually associated with recurrent vomiting and abdominal pain. Rarely, people with dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency experience weakness of the muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles), particularly during exercise; droopy eyelids; or a weakened heart muscle (cardiomyopathy). Other features of this condition include excess ammonia in the blood (hyperammonemia), a buildup of molecules called ketones in the body (ketoacidosis), or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia).

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Congenital secretory chloride diarrhea is an autosomal recessive form of severe chronic diarrhea characterized by excretion of large amounts of watery stool containing high levels of chloride, resulting in dehydration, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis. The electrolyte disorder resembles the renal disorder Bartter syndrome, except that chloride diarrhea is not associated with calcium level abnormalities.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Familial hyperaldosteronism is a group of inherited conditions in which the adrenal glands, which are small glands located on top of each kidney, produce too much of the hormone aldosterone. Aldosterone helps control the amount of salt retained by the kidneys. Excess aldosterone causes the kidneys to retain more salt than normal, which in turn increases the body's fluid levels and blood pressure. People with familial hyperaldosteronism may develop severe high blood pressure (hypertension), often early in life. Without treatment, hypertension increases the risk of strokes, heart attacks, and kidney failure.

Test Details
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Delivery Time:
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Fabry disease is an inherited disorder that results from the buildup of a particular type of fat, called globotriaosylceramide, in the body's cells. Beginning in childhood, this buildup causes signs and symptoms that affect many parts of the body. Characteristic features of Fabry disease include episodes of pain, particularly in the hands and feet (acroparesthesias); clusters of small, dark red spots on the skin called angiokeratomas; a decreased ability to sweat (hypohidrosis); cloudiness of the front part of the eye (corneal opacity); problems with the gastrointestinal system; ringing in the ears (tinnitus); and hearing loss. Fabry disease also involves potentially life-threatening complications such as progressive kidney damage, heart attack, and stroke. Some affected individuals have milder forms of the disorder that appear later in life and affect only the heart or kidneys.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:

McArdle disease is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by onset of exercise intolerance and muscle cramps in childhood or adolescence. Transient myoglobinuria may occur after exercise, due to rhabdomyolysis. Severe myoglobinuria may lead to acute renal failure. Patients may report muscle weakness, myalgia, and lack of endurance since childhood or adolescence. Later in adult life, there is persistent and progressive muscle weakness and atrophy with fatty replacement. McArdle disease is a relatively benign disorder, except for possible renal failure as a complication of myoglobinuria.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Delivery Time:
5 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a pathologic finding in several renal disorders that manifest clinically as proteinuria and progressive decline in renal function. Some patients with FSGS develop the clinical entity called 'nephrotic syndrome', which includes massive proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia, and edema. However, patients with FSGS may have proteinuria in the nephrotic range without other features of the nephrotic syndrome.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder due to deficient activity of beta-glucocerebrosidase. As a result of this deficiency, there is intracellular accumulation of glucosylceramide.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:

Galactosemia is a disorder that affects how the body processes a simple sugar called galactose. A small amount of galactose is present in many foods. It is primarily part of a larger sugar called lactose, which is found in all dairy products and many baby formulas. The signs and symptoms of galactosemia result from an inability to use galactose to produce energy.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Glycogen storage disease II, an autosomal recessive disorder, is the prototypic lysosomal storage disease. In the classic infantile form (Pompe disease), cardiomyopathy and muscular hypotonia are the cardinal features; in the juvenile and adult forms, involvement of skeletal muscles dominates the clinical picture.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:

Galactosemia is a disorder that affects how the body processes a simple sugar called galactose. A small amount of galactose is present in many foods. It is primarily part of a larger sugar called lactose, which is found in all dairy products and many baby formulas. The signs and symptoms of galactosemia result from an inability to use galactose to produce energy. The signs and symptoms of galactosemia type III vary from mild to severe and can include cataracts, delayed growth and development, intellectual disability, liver disease, and kidney problems.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Glycogen storage disease type 0 (also known as GSD 0) is a condition caused by the body's inability to form a complex sugar called glycogen, which is a major source of stored energy in the body. GSD 0 has two types: in muscle GSD 0, glycogen formation in the muscles is impaired, and in liver GSD 0, glycogen formation in the liver is impaired.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is a genetic disorder that occurs almost exclusively in males. This condition mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen from the lungs to tissues throughout the body. In affected individuals, a defect in an enzyme called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase causes red blood cells to break down prematurely. This destruction of red blood cells is called hemolysis.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Hemophilia B due to factor IX deficiency is phenotypically indistinguishable from hemophilia A (306700), which results from deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (F8; 300841). The classic laboratory findings in hemophilia B include a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and a normal prothrombin time.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Primary hyperoxaluria type I is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an accumulation of calcium oxalate in various bodily tissues, especially the kidney, resulting in renal failure. Affected individuals have decreased or absent AGXT activity and a failure to transaminate glyoxylate, which causes the accumulated glyoxylate to be oxidized to oxalate. This overproduction of oxalate results in the accumulation of nonsoluble calcium oxalate in various body tissues, with pathologic sequelae.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Hereditary hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism wherein the body accumulates excess iron. Excess iron is deposited in a variety of organs leading to their failure, and resulting in serious illnesses including cirrhosis, hepatomas, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, arthritis, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Severe effects of the disease usually do not appear until after decades of progressive iron loading. Removal of excess iron by therapeutic phlebotomy decreases morbidity and mortality if instituted early in the course of the disease. Classic hemochromatosis (HFE) is most often caused by mutation in a gene designated HFE on chromosome

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Delivery Time:
5 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ability to digest the sugar fructose. Fructose is a simple sugar found primarily in fruits. Affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of the disorder in infancy when fruits, juices, or other foods containing fructose are introduced into the diet. After ingesting fructose, individuals with hereditary fructose intolerance may experience nausea, bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Affected infants may fail to grow and gain weight at the expected rate (failure to thrive).

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in the activity of coagulation factor VIII. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous with variable severity, depending on the plasma levels of coagulation factor VIII: mild, with levels 6 to 30% of normal; moderate, with levels 2 to 5% of normal; and severe, with levels less than 1% of normal. Patients with mild hemophilia usually bleed excessively only after trauma or surgery, whereas those with severe hemophilia have an annual average of 20 to 30 episodes of spontaneous or excessive bleeding after minor trauma, particularly into joints and muscles. These symptoms differ substantially from those of bleeding disorders due to platelet defects or von Willebrand disease (193400), in which mucosal bleeding predominates.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:
Description:
Delivery Time:
15 days
Sample:
6ml. venom blood sample
Alternative:
Description:
Delivery Time:
5 days
Sample:
6ml. venom blood sample
Alternative:

Familial hypercholesterolemia is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by elevation of serum cholesterol bound to low density lipoprotein (LDL), which promotes deposition of cholesterol in the skin (xanthelasma), tendons (xanthomas), and coronary arteries (atherosclerosis). The disorder occurs in 2 clinical forms: homozygous and heterozygous.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:

Most individuals with familial hypertriglyceridemia have a hyperlipoproteinemia IV (144600) phenotype. Relatives of affected persons (ascertained in a study of survivors of coronary occlusion) were found to have normal cholesterol distribution and bimodal triglyceride distribution (Goldstein et al., 1973). Hypertriglyceridemia is not completely expressed in affected children.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is a progressive renal disorder characterized by excessive urinary Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) excretion. There is progressive loss of kidney function, and in about 50% of cases, the need for renal replacement therapy arises as early as the second decade of life.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Lowe syndrome is a condition that primarily affects the eyes, brain, and kidneys. This disorder occurs almost exclusively in males. Infants with Lowe syndrome are born with thick clouding of the lenses in both eyes (congenital cataracts), often with other eye abnormalities that can impair vision. About half of affected infants develop an eye disease called infantile glaucoma, which is characterized by increased pressure within the eyes. Many individuals with Lowe syndrome have delayed development, and intellectual ability ranges from normal to severely impaired. Behavioral problems and seizures have also been reported in children with this condition. Most affected children have weak muscle tone from birth (neonatal hypotonia), which can contribute to feeding difficulties, problems with breathing, and delayed development of motor skills such as sitting, standing, and walking.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MOCOD) is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by onset in infancy of poor feeding, intractable seizures, and severe psychomotor retardation. Characteristic biochemical abnormalities include decreased serum uric acid and increased urine sulfite levels due to the combined enzymatic deficiency of xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase, both of which use molybdenum as a cofactor. Most affected individuals die in early childhood.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

The Sanfilippo syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis III, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease due to impaired degradation of heparan sulfate. The disorder is characterized by severe central nervous system degeneration, but only mild somatic disease. Onset of clinical features usually occurs between 2 and 6 years; severe neurologic degeneration occurs in most patients between 6 and 10 years of age, and death occurs typically during the second or third decade of life.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Methylmalonic aciduria is a genetically heterogeneous disorder of methylmalonate and cobalamin metabolism. Isolated methylmalonic aciduria is found in patients with mutations in the MUT gene causing partial, mut(-), or complete, mut(0), enzyme deficiency. This form is unresponsive to B12 therapy. Various forms of isolated methylmalonic aciduria also occur in a subset of patients with defects in the synthesis of the MUT coenzyme adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and are classified according to complementation group: caused by mutation in the MMAA gene on chromosome 4q31 and caused by mutation in the MMAB gene.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-5 is an autosomal recessive progressive multisystem disorder clinically characterized by onset between the second and fifth decades of life of ptosis, progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), gastrointestinal dysmotility (often pseudoobstruction), cachexia, diffuse leukoencephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial DNA abnormalities can include depletion, deletion, and point mutations

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a condition that prevents the body from converting certain fats to energy, particularly during periods without food (fasting).

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
5 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Methylmalonic aciduria is a genetically heterogeneous disorder of methylmalonate and cobalamin metabolism. Isolated methylmalonic aciduria is found in patients with mutations in the MUT gene causing partial, mut(-), or complete, mut(0), enzyme deficiency. This form is unresponsive to B12 therapy. Various forms of isolated methylmalonic aciduria also occur in a subset of patients with defects in the synthesis of the MUT coenzyme adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and are classified according to complementation group: caused by mutation in the MMAA gene on chromosome 4q31 and caused by mutation in the MMAB gene.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
4 months
Sample:
6ml. venomous blood
Alternative:

The major clinical features of maple syrup urine disease are mental and physical retardation, feeding problems, and a maple syrup odor to the urine. The keto acids of the branched-chain amino acids are present in the urine, resulting from a block in oxidative decarboxylation. There are 5 clinical subtypes of MSUD: the 'classic' neonatal severe form, an 'intermediate' form, an 'intermittent' form, a 'thiamine-responsive' form, and an 'E3-deficient with lactic acidosis' form (246900). All of these subtypes can be caused by mutations in any of the 4 genes mentioned above, except for the E3-deficient form, which is caused only by mutation in the E3 gene.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-9 is an autosomal recessive progressive multisystem disorder clinically characterized by onset between the second and fifth decades of life of ptosis, progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), gastrointestinal dysmotility (often pseudoobstruction), cachexia, diffuse leukoencephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial DNA abnormalities can include depletion, deletion, and point mutations

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive lipid storage disorder characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Approximately 95% of cases are caused by mutations in the NPC1 gene, referred to as type C1; 5% are caused by mutations in the NPC2 gene, referred to as type C2. The clinical manifestations of types C1 and C2 are similar because the respective genes are both involved in egress of lipids, particularly cholesterol, from late endosomes or lysosomes.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:

Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive lipid storage disorder characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Approximately 95% of cases are caused by mutations in the NPC1 gene, referred to as type C1; 5% are caused by mutations in the NPC2 gene, referred to as type C2. The clinical manifestations of types C1 and C2 are similar because the respective genes are both involved in egress of lipids, particularly cholesterol, from late endosomes or lysosomes.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:

Niemann-Pick disease types A and B are caused by an inherited deficiency of acid sphingomyelinase activity. The clinical phenotype ranges from a severe infantile form with neurologic degeneration resulting in death usually by 3 years of age (type A) to a later-onset nonneurologic form (type B) that is compatible with survival into adulthood. Since intermediate cases also have been reported, the disease is best regarded a single entity with a clinical spectrum

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes ammonia to accumulate in the blood. Ammonia, which is formed when proteins are broken down in the body, is toxic if the levels become too high. The nervous system is especially sensitive to the effects of excess ammonia. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency often becomes evident in the first few days of life. This severe, early-onset form of the disorder usually affects males; it is very rare in females. An infant with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency may be lacking in energy (lethargic) or unwilling to eat, and have a poorly-controlled breathing rate or body temperature. Some babies with this disorder may experience unusual body movements, seizures, or coma. Complications from ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency may include developmental delay and intellectual disability. Progressive liver damage, skin lesions, and brittle hair may also occur.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:

Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, characterized by a combination of various seizure types, usually occurs in the first hours of life and is unresponsive to standard anticonvulsants, responding only to immediate administration of pyridoxine hydrochloride. The dependence is permanent, and the interruption of daily pyridoxine supplementation leads to the recurrence of seizures.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10д
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) in man denotes impaired production of growth hormone (GH) and one or more of the other 5 anterior pituitary hormones. Mutations of the POU1F1 gene in the human and Pit1 in the mouse are responsible for pleiotropic deficiencies of GH, prolactin (PRL), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), while the production of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) are preserved. In infancy severe growth deficiency from birth as well as distinctive facial features with prominent forehead, marked midfacial hypoplasia with depressed nasal bridge, deep-set eyes, and a short nose with anteverted nostrils and hypoplastic pituitary gland by MRI examination can be seen. Some cases present with severe mental retardation along with short stature.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:

Phenylketonuria (commonly known as PKU) is an inherited disorder that increases the levels of a substance called phenylalanine in the blood. Phenylalanine is a building block of proteins (an amino acid) that is obtained through the diet. It is found in all proteins and in some artificial sweeteners. If PKU is not treated, phenylalanine can build up to harmful levels in the body, causing intellectual disability and other serious health problems.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a disorder that causes progressive liver disease, which typically leads to liver failure. In people with PFIC, liver cells are less able to secrete a digestive fluid called bile. The buildup of bile in liver cells causes liver disease in affected individuals.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 mL Blood - Lavender Top Tube
Alternative:

Vitamin B6, or pyridoxal 5-prime-phosphate (PLP), is critical for normal cellular function, and some cancer cells have notable differences in vitamin B6 metabolism compared to their normal counterparts. The rate-limiting enzyme in vitamin B6 synthesis is pyridoxine 5-prime-phosphate (PNP) oxidase.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Sulfite Oxidase Deficiency showed that the defect in this disorder is indeed in sulfite oxidase and not in the specific molybdenum (Mo) cofactor required for activation of de-molybdo sulfite oxidase. For a disorder of the molybdenum cofactor. Antibody specific for sulfite oxidase showed no crossreacting material.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Sjogren-Larsson syndrome is an autosomal recessive, early childhood-onset disorder characterized by ichthyosis, mental retardation, spastic paraparesis, macular dystrophy, and leukoencephalopathy. It is caused by deficiency of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital malformation and mental retardation syndrome. Although historically a clinical distinction was often made between a classic 'type I' disorder and a more severe 'type II' disorder, in reality the syndrome constitutes a clinical and biochemical continuum from mild to severe.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Von Willebrand disease is a bleeding disorder that slows the blood clotting process, causing prolonged bleeding after an injury. People with this condition often experience easy bruising, long-lasting nosebleeds, and excessive bleeding or oozing following an injury, surgery, or dental work. Mild forms of von Willebrand disease may become apparent only when abnormal bleeding occurs following surgery or a serious injury. Women with this condition typically have heavy or prolonged bleeding during menstruation (menorrhagia), and some may also experience reproductive tract bleeding during pregnancy and childbirth. In severe cases of von Willebrand disease, heavy bleeding occurs after minor trauma or even in the absence of injury (spontaneous bleeding). Symptoms of von Willebrand disease may change over time. Increased age, pregnancy, exercise, and stress may cause bleeding symptoms to become less frequent.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
20 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative:

Deficiency of lysosomal acid lipase causes 2 distinct phenotypes in humans: Wolman disease and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD). Wolman disease is an early-onset fulminant disorder of infancy with massive infiltration of the liver, spleen, and other organs by macrophages filled with cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Death occurs early in life. Wolman disease is very rare, with an incidence of less than one in 100,000 live births. CESD is a milder, later-onset disorder with primary hepatic involvement by macrophages engorged with cholesteryl esters. This slowly progressive visceral disease has a very wide spectrum of involvement ranging from early onset with severe cirrhosis to later onset of more slowly progressive hepatic disease with survival into adulthood.

Test Details
Description:
Delivery Time:
10 days
Sample:
2-5 Ml Venous Blood Sample / DNA sample
Alternative: