Stomach ulcer

What is a stomach ulcer? Stomach ulcers, which are also known as gastric ulcers, are painful sores in the stomach lining. Stomach ulcers are a type of peptic ulcer disease. Peptic ulcers are any ulcers that affect both the stomach and small intestines. Stomach ulcers occur when the thick layer of mucus that protects your stomach from digestive juices is reduced. This allows the digestive acids to eat away at the tissues that line the stomach, causing an ulcer. Stomach ulcers may be easily cured, but they can become severe without proper treatment. What causes stomach ulcers? Stomach ulcers are almost always caused by one of the following: • an infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) • long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen Rarely, a condition known as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome can cause stomach and intestinal ulcers by increasing the body’s production of acid. This syndrome is suspected to cause less than 1 percent of all peptic ulcers.

<p> Helicobacter pylori is the main reason for the most common gastric diseases. Infection with pathogenic bacteria Helicobacter pylori causes inflammation of the stomach lining. </p> <p> • Bacteria have been shown to be a major cause of gastritis and ulcer, and can lead to stomach cancer. </p> <p> • H. pylori is associated with complicated digestion, heartburn and stomach ache. </p> <p> • Over 70% of Bulgarians are infected with Helicobacter pylori. • The only bacterium recognized by the World Health Organization as a Class I carcinogen. </p>

Test Details
Description:
In Vitro nucleic acid amplification test for qualitative detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the clinical material, using real-time hybridization-fluorescence detection of amplified products.
Delivery Time:
Понеделник
Sample:
Biopsy material of gastric mucosa
Alternative:
Faeces

Helicobacter pylori is the main reason for the most common gastric diseases Infection with pathogenic bacteria Helicobacter pylori causes inflammation of the stomach lining. • Bacteria have been shown to be a major cause of gastritis and ulcer, and can lead to stomach cancer. • H. pylori is associated with complicated digestion, heartburn and stomach ache. • Over 70% of Bulgarians are infected with Helicobacter pylori. • The only bacterium recognized by the World Health Organization as a Class I carcinogen.

Test Details
Description:
What is the urea breath test? The urea breath test (UBT) is a test for diagnosing the presence of a bacterium, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the stomach. H. pylori causes inflammation, ulcers, and atrophy of the stomach. The test also may be used to demonstrate that H. pylori has been eliminated by treatment with antibiotics. What is the basis of this test? The urea breath test is based on the ability of H. pylori to break down urea, a chemical made up of nitrogen and carbon, into carbon dioxide which then is absorbed from the stomach and eliminated in the breath. (Urea normally is produced by the body from excess or "waste" nitrogen-containing chemicals and then eliminated in the urine.) How is this breath test done? For the test, patients swallow a capsule containing urea made from an isotope of carbon. (Isotopes of carbon occur in minuscule amounts in nature, and can be measured with special testing machines.) If H. pylori is present in the stomach, the urea is broken up and turned into carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is absorbed across the lining of the stomach and into the blood. It then travels in the blood to the lungs where it is excreted in the breath. Samples of exhaled breath are collected, and the isotopic carbon in the exhaled carbon dioxide is measured. How are the results of the urea breath test interpreted? If the isotope is detected in the breath, it means that H. pylori is present in the stomach. If the isotope is not found, H. pylori is not present. When the H. pylori is effectively treated (eradicated) by antibiotics, the test changes from positive (isotope present) to negative (isotope absent). Are there any risks or complications of the urea breath test? There are no risks or complications of the urea breath test. There is no need to stop any medications (including proton pump inhibitors) prior to performing the urea breath test.
Delivery Time:
1 day
Sample:
Respiratory sampling
Alternative: