Stomach cancer

Stomach cancer begins when cancer cells form in the inner lining of your stomach. These cells can grow into a tumor. Also called gastric cancer, the disease usually grows slowly over many years. If you know the symptoms it causes, you and your doctor may be able to spot it early, when it’s easiest to treat. What Causes Stomach Cancer? Scientists don’t know exactly what makes cancer cells start growing in the stomach. But they do know a few things that can raise your risk for the disease. One of them is infection with a common bacteria, H. pylori, which causes ulcers. Inflammation in your gut called gastritis, a certain type of long-lasting anemia called pernicious anemia, and growths in your stomach called polyps also can make you more likely to get cancer.

<p> Helicobacter pylori is the main reason for the most common gastric diseases. Infection with pathogenic bacteria Helicobacter pylori causes inflammation of the stomach lining. </p> <p> • Bacteria have been shown to be a major cause of gastritis and ulcer, and can lead to stomach cancer. </p> <p> • H. pylori is associated with complicated digestion, heartburn and stomach ache. </p> <p> • Over 70% of Bulgarians are infected with Helicobacter pylori. • The only bacterium recognized by the World Health Organization as a Class I carcinogen. </p>

Test Details
Description:
In Vitro nucleic acid amplification test for qualitative detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the clinical material, using real-time hybridization-fluorescence detection of amplified products.
Delivery Time:
Понеделник
Sample:
Biopsy material of gastric mucosa
Alternative:
Faeces

Helicobacter pylori is the main reason for the most common gastric diseases Infection with pathogenic bacteria Helicobacter pylori causes inflammation of the stomach lining. • Bacteria have been shown to be a major cause of gastritis and ulcer, and can lead to stomach cancer. • H. pylori is associated with complicated digestion, heartburn and stomach ache. • Over 70% of Bulgarians are infected with Helicobacter pylori. • The only bacterium recognized by the World Health Organization as a Class I carcinogen.

Test Details
Description:
What is the urea breath test? The urea breath test (UBT) is a test for diagnosing the presence of a bacterium, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the stomach. H. pylori causes inflammation, ulcers, and atrophy of the stomach. The test also may be used to demonstrate that H. pylori has been eliminated by treatment with antibiotics. What is the basis of this test? The urea breath test is based on the ability of H. pylori to break down urea, a chemical made up of nitrogen and carbon, into carbon dioxide which then is absorbed from the stomach and eliminated in the breath. (Urea normally is produced by the body from excess or "waste" nitrogen-containing chemicals and then eliminated in the urine.) How is this breath test done? For the test, patients swallow a capsule containing urea made from an isotope of carbon. (Isotopes of carbon occur in minuscule amounts in nature, and can be measured with special testing machines.) If H. pylori is present in the stomach, the urea is broken up and turned into carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is absorbed across the lining of the stomach and into the blood. It then travels in the blood to the lungs where it is excreted in the breath. Samples of exhaled breath are collected, and the isotopic carbon in the exhaled carbon dioxide is measured. How are the results of the urea breath test interpreted? If the isotope is detected in the breath, it means that H. pylori is present in the stomach. If the isotope is not found, H. pylori is not present. When the H. pylori is effectively treated (eradicated) by antibiotics, the test changes from positive (isotope present) to negative (isotope absent). Are there any risks or complications of the urea breath test? There are no risks or complications of the urea breath test. There is no need to stop any medications (including proton pump inhibitors) prior to performing the urea breath test.
Delivery Time:
1 day
Sample:
Respiratory sampling
Alternative: